The First Art Newspaper on the Net   Established in 1996 Saturday, December 5, 2020


New book presents photographs by Carole Glauber taken with a Brownie Camera
Ben and Sam at the Dining Room Table, 1998.



NEW YORK, NY.- For thirty years, photographer Carole Glauber pointed her Brownie Hawkeye camera at her children as they did what children do -- played outside with the hose, dug in the sand, twirled a hula hoop and as time goes by have a bar mitzvah, graduate from high school, marry. Presented chronologically in the book, the photographs capture the two boys growing up before the viewer's eyes. But the utilization of the Brownie year after year producing images with the camera's signature, ephemeral look, provides a consistent emotional content overlay, even as the sons change and mature.

This is one family and their stories documented by a photographer who also happened to be a mother; yet one of photography's great gifts as a medium is that by providing a glimpse of someone else's narrative, the viewer is in essence borrowing bits and pieces of someone else's story to remind and springboard into parts of one's own narrative buried away and suddenly unearthed to the light of day.

Celebrated photographer Elinor Carucci contributed an essay for Glauber's book, and in it she highlights this point. "As a viewer, there was a sense that I might never know some of the stories behind those images, but I might think about my own...As if I had visited someone else’s dream."

The camera choice contributed to this "dream-like" quality in Glauber's images. The Kodak Brownie Hawkeye box camera was developed in the late 1940s and the distinctive hazy look in the resulting photographs become a narrative aspect all its own within Glauber's body of work. The soft focus from the uncoated one-element lens is a vintage look, suggesting a time passed, a moment distilled to a memory.

Glauber's process in and of itself also contributes to the thematic element of time that courses through her work. By consistently chronicling moments over decades, the photographs become markers of what has passed, while also unfolding a kind of tomorrow that exists beyond the frame of the images.




"There is a universal aspect to this passage of time, to meeting the unknown, a collaboration between individuals, this complexity of perceptions, and recording of gesture," Glauber shares.

Carucci notes the role of the Brownie look in the time-keeping aspect to Glauber's personal storytelling methodology that also allows the photography genre to be blurred at times by hinting at family snapshot within the fine art context.

"Carole Glauber captures moments as they are stored in our brains, doing so in part with the use of a particular technique created by her choice to use a 1950s Kodak Brownie Hawkeye camera," Carucci discusses. "Choosing this aesthetic, she walks the line between images that feel composed and intentional, and some that feel almost on the verge of vernacular photography, and so creates an authentic and intimate feeling, having the images move between private and voyeuristic, often using the aesthetic of family album and snapshot photography."

Both of Glauber's sons (the subjects in the images) are now grown and each contributed their thoughts on the project. When noting an image of himself as a child on a curved wooden path, Sam Glauber-Zimra writes, “Where will this trail take me as it winds its way between the hills? That question is left for the viewers to answer, for the endpoint of the walkway curves away behind a nearby slope, hidden from the observer.”

The questions left to ask or answer fill in the gaps insinuated in an image or by a body of work. Involving the viewer in this way prompts connection and adds value to not only a specific body of work such as Glauber's, but the field of photography, as a whole. When sharing her thoughts about the many years of photographing her family life and sharing the images with the world outside the walls of her home, Glauber reflects, "This involvement created innumerable paths connecting one place to the next, with many stops and starts along the way. I began to recognize a degree of contemplation in the moment, learning that in many ways we are all one."

Carole Glauber is a photographer and photo historian. Her work has been included in many group and solo exhibitions worldwide, and she has received numerous awards for her photography and photographic research. These honors include the PX3 Prix de la Photographie, Paris, the International Photography Award, the Julia Margaret Cameron Award, the Tokyo International Foto Award, the Mobile Photography Award, the PHmuseum Mobile Photography Prize, and the Pollux Award for her photographs, as well as the Peter E. Palmquist Historical Photographic Research Fellowship, the Winterthur Museum Fellowship, an Oregon Humanities Research Fellowship, and a National Coalition of Independent Scholars grant for her photographic research. She has lectured and written about photography, and her essays have been published in the Photo Review, the Oregon Historical Quarterly, the Oregon Encyclopedia Project, and The Cambridge Dictionary of Judaism and Jewish Culture. Glauber is the author of Witch of Kodakery: The Photography of Myra Albert Wiggins 1869–1956 (Washington State University Press, 1997).










Today's News

September 28, 2020

Major exhibition focuses on the fascination of espionage in contemporary art

Multimedia Art Museum in Moscow presents an exhibition of photographs by Sergei Chilikov

First edition of Charles Darwin's On the Origin of Species sells at auction for £38,400

A painter who puts it all on the line

First comprehensive overview of Hito Steyerl's work in a German museum opens at K21

World War II submarine is found in Southeast Asia

Movies and museums are coming back. Should you go?

Ruiz-Healy Art opens an exhibition featuring works by Richard Armendariz and Andrés Ferrandis

Solo exhibition of the early work of seasoned New York artist Natvar Bhavsar opens at Aicon Art

Dana Schutz presents a selection of new paintings and bronze sculptures at Thomas Dane Gallery

Muralist captures the Ursinus experience on landmark smokestack

'I am just going out and may be some time:' sketch of Captain Oates sells in Essex

Princess Beatrice's wedding dress goes on display at Windsor Castle

Rare artist's edition of the 'Missions Collection' made by Omega offered at auction

Mississippi Museum of Art presents monumental participatory sculpture in its outdoor art garden

Fine Crimean War Naval V.C. to be offered at Dix Noonan Webb

Georgian film sweeps San Sebastian festival awards

The lost weekend

New book presents photographs by Carole Glauber taken with a Brownie Camera

New commission by California artist Pae White at San José Museum of Art

Collectors can score key LeBron James, Kobe Bryant and 'Greek Freak' modern cards

'Button Power' by Carter and Hake explores how pin-back buttons were the social media of their day

Martin Luther, Edgar Allan Poe, Henry David Thoreau among fine autographs and artifacts up for auction

Lots bring high dollars at Holabird's Great American Pow-Wow Auction

How to Make Mindfulness Paintings That Depict Happiness

The Root of Event Streaming in Covid19 Tough Times

Advantages and disadvantages of Bitcoin trading

Why do you need to use Bots during Bitcoin trading?

Here's how people have changed their daily routine during the COVID19 pandemic

How You Can Do More Than Watch TV With At-Home Education





Museums, Exhibits, Artists, Milestones, Digital Art, Architecture, Photography,
Photographers, Special Photos, Special Reports, Featured Stories, Auctions, Art Fairs,
Anecdotes, Art Quiz, Education, Mythology, 3D Images, Last Week, .

 



Founder:
Ignacio Villarreal
(1941 - 2019)
Editor & Publisher: Jose Villarreal
Art Director: Juan José Sepúlveda Ramírez

Royalville Communications, Inc
produces:

ignaciovillarreal.org avemariasound.org juncodelavega.com facundocabral-elfinal.org
Founder's Site. The most varied versions
of this beautiful prayer.
Hommage
to a Mexican poet.
Hommage
       

The First Art Newspaper on the Net. The Best Versions Of Ave Maria Song Junco de la Vega Site Ignacio Villarreal Site
Tell a Friend
Dear User, please complete the form below in order to recommend the Artdaily newsletter to someone you know.
Please complete all fields marked *.
Sending Mail
Sending Successful