The First Art Newspaper on the Net    Established in 1996 Saturday, December 4, 2021


Louvre recovers 16th-century armour, four decades after theft
Jean-Luc Martinez, president of the Louvre Museum, holds an ancient breastplate during its official restitution in Paris, on March 3, 2021. A breastplate and a ceremonial helmet, two "exceptional" objects from the Italian Renaissance, were handed over by the police to the Louvre museum after being found in Bordeaux during an auction linked to an estate. These objects, which belonged to the collection of the Baroness de Rothschild, had been donated to the Louvre in 1922 and stolen in 1983. Estimations say they worth around 500,000 euros. Thomas SAMSON / AFP.



PARIS (AFP).- The Louvre museum in Paris said Wednesday that it had recovered a set of gold and silver-encrusted Renaissance-era armour nearly 40 years after it was stolen.

A military antiques expert alerted police after being called in to give advice regarding an inheritance in Bordeaux in January and becoming suspicious about the luxurious helmet and body armour in the family's collection.

Police later identified the items from a database of stolen artworks as having been taken from the Louvre on May 31, 1983, in circumstances that remain a mystery.

Bordeaux prosecutors are now investigating how they ended up in the family's estate.

The armour and helmet are thought to have been made in Milan between 1560 and 1580. They were donated to the Louvre in 1922 by the Rothschild family.

"I was certain we would see them reappear one day because they are such singular objects. But I could never have imagined that it would work out so well -- that they would be in France and still together," said Philippe Malgouyres, the Louvre's head of heritage artworks.

"They are prestige weapons, made with virtuosity, sort of the equivalent of a luxury car today. In the 16th century, weapons became works of very luxurious art. Armour became an ornament that had nothing to do with its use," he said.

There are 100,000 objects on France's database of global stolen artworks, with 900 added last year alone.

According to Jean-Luc Martinez, president-director of the Louvre, the last theft from the world's most-visited museum was in 1998, a portrait by 19th-century French artist Jean-Baptiste Camille Corot.

"We're still looking for it," Martinez said.


© Agence France-Presse










Today's News

March 4, 2021

'Limitless! Five Women Reshape Contemporary Art' opens at McNay Art Museum

Louvre recovers 16th-century armour, four decades after theft

Boy Scouts will sell nearly 60 Norman Rockwell works to pay sex-abuse claims

The Louvre turns to merch

Nationalmuseum acquires a floral still life by Berjon

New technique reveals centuries of secrets in locked letters

White Cube opens an online exhibition of works by Gilbert & George

Toko Shinoda dies at 107; Fused calligraphy with abstract expressionism

Ruiz-Healy Art opens group exhibition "Plurality of Isolations"

Kunsthalle Basel opens an exhibition of works by Lydia Ourahmane

IMMA opens an exhibition of the work of Chantal Joffe inspired by Lucian Freud's paintings of his mother

Miller & Miller announces Music Machines, Clocks & Canadiana auction

South Street Seaport Museum launches collections online portal featuring over 1,300 pieces on virtual display

New leadership appointments at Christie's

Ten important works by Edward Seago to go up for auction at Dreweatts

Ruth Noack named Executive Director and Curator of new cultural center The Corner At Whitman-Walker

Nohra Haime Gallery opens an exhibition of works by Valerie Hird

Asya Geisberg Gallery opens Angelina Gualdoni's fifth solo exhibition with the gallery

Sargent's Daughters opens a solo exhibition of video, installation and works on paper by Abbey Williams

Over £94,000-worth of contemporary art sold on behalf of Kettle's Yard House and Gallery

Karl Lagerfeld's mirror leads Bonhams Modern Design │ Art auction

Sex tape satire at Berlin fest tackles pandemic-era 'hypocrisy'

Margaret Maron, acclaimed mystery writer, dies at 82

New York to allow limited live performances to resume in April




Museums, Exhibits, Artists, Milestones, Digital Art, Architecture, Photography,
Photographers, Special Photos, Special Reports, Featured Stories, Auctions, Art Fairs,
Anecdotes, Art Quiz, Education, Mythology, 3D Images, Last Week, .

 



Founder:
Ignacio Villarreal
(1941 - 2019)
Editor & Publisher: Jose Villarreal
Art Director: Juan José Sepúlveda Ramírez

Royalville Communications, Inc
produces:

ignaciovillarreal.org avemariasound.org juncodelavega.com facundocabral-elfinal.org
Founder's Site. The most varied versions
of this beautiful prayer.
Hommage
to a Mexican poet.
Hommage
       

The First Art Newspaper on the Net. The Best Versions Of Ave Maria Song Junco de la Vega Site Ignacio Villarreal Site
Tell a Friend
Dear User, please complete the form below in order to recommend the Artdaily newsletter to someone you know.
Please complete all fields marked *.
Sending Mail
Sending Successful