Frist Art Museum opens "Monsters & Myths: Surrealism and War in the 1930s and 1940s"
The First Art Newspaper on the Net    Established in 1996 Wednesday, July 24, 2024


Frist Art Museum opens "Monsters & Myths: Surrealism and War in the 1930s and 1940s"
Salvador Dalí. Apparition of Face and Fruit Dish on a Beach, 1938–39. Oil on canvas, 45 x 56 5/8 in. The Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art: The Ella Gallup Sumner and Mary Catlin Sumner Collection Fund, 1938.269. © 2019 Salvador Dalí, Fundació Gala-Salvador Dalí / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.



NASHVILLE, TENN.- The Frist Art Museum presents Monsters & Myths: Surrealism and War in the 1930s and 1940s, an exhibition that explores the powerful and unsettling images created in response to the threat of war and fascist rule. Featuring works by Luis Buñuel, Salvador Dalí, Max Ernst, René Magritte, Joan Miró, Pablo Picasso, Dorothea Tanning, and others, the exhibition is on display in the Frist’s Upper-Level Galleries from June 21 through September 29, 2019.

Through 78 objects, including paintings, drawings, film, and sculptures drawn primarily from the collections of The Baltimore Museum of Art and The Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art, Monsters & Myths highlights the brilliance and fertility of this period, which arose in response to Hitler’s rise to power, the Spanish Civil War, and World War II—events that profoundly challenged the revolutionary hopes that had guided most Surrealist artists in the 1920s. “In this exhibition, Surrealists’ portrayals of monsters, fragmented bodies, and other depictions of the grotesque are explored as metaphors for the threat of violence and fears and fantasies of unbridled power,” says Frist Art Museum chief curator Mark Scala.

Since 1924, artists and writers associated with the Surrealist movement had aimed to deconstruct the social order, particularly through targeting oppressive traditions by embracing the irrational and the marvelous in pursuit of psychic liberation. “Seeking access to hidden truths, the artists in this show used their darkest imaginings to confront trauma,” says Scala. “They employed the language of dreams, free association, and Freudian psychoanalytic theory to help transform both themselves and a society that seemed inescapably bound for fascism and war.”

Through each artist, the psychological power of monstrosities appears in different guises in the exhibition. The first section, titled “The Emergence of Monsters,” focuses on the symbolism of deformation, fragmentation, and hybridity to reflect the inhumanity of war as well as individual psychological torment. In this section, Picasso reintroduces the myth of the Minotaur, a symbol of the repressed forces of the unconscious. Hans Bellmer and André Masson merge violence and malevolent sexuality in images of dismemberment and mutilation. Headless bodies in works by Alberto Giacometti and Magritte symbolize the loss of reason.

The exhibition continues with the section titled “The Spanish Civil War,” which includes paintings and prints by Dalí, Miró, and Picasso, among others, capturing their despair at the brutality of the fascists in their war with the republican government. Immediately following “The Spanish Civil War,” the section “World War II” features works that portend the coming disasters and capture the emotional upheavals experienced by artists during the early years of the war. While these responses are marked by anxiety and distress, a surprising beauty can be seen in even the most horrific works, such as Wolfgang Paalen’s painting of colorful bird-like demons in The Battle of Saturnian Princes III (1939).

The section “Dislocation and Survival” features extraordinary paintings by Surrealists, including Dalí, Ernst, Masson, and Roberto Matta who fled the war, mostly for the United States. Ernst’s painting Europe After the Rain II (1940–42) spans the mutating structures and human wraiths of a post-apocalyptic Europe with the crystalline outcroppings of a desert landscape, inspired by Ernst’s experience as an exile visiting Arizona. Like the other works in this section, Europe After the Rain II underscores transitions between past and present, reality and dream, and reason and irrationality that were acutely felt by these expatriate artists.

The exhibition concludes with “Surrealism in the Americas,” showing the influence of exiled European artists like Masson and Ernst on Americans such as Jackson Pollock, Mark Rothko, and Tanning. Highlights include Tanning’s phantasmagorical painting The Temptation of Saint Anthony. Also included in the exhibition is the film Un Chien Andalou (1929) by Buñuel and Dalí, which contains a network of narratives relating to anticlericalism, unfulfilled desire, memory, and death.










Today's News

June 23, 2019

Exhibition at the Fonds Helene et Edouard Leclerc focuses on cabinets of curiosities

Exhibition explores 300 years of lunar and celestial cartography

Yorkshire Sculpture Park opens a major exhibition of over 40 works by David Smith

Mexican artisans want credit for designs behind Carolina Herrera dresses

New Bouguereau exhibition reexamines artist's popularity in Gilded Age America

Exhibition highlights a selection of contemporary artists who work with ceramics

Lehmann Maupin opens a group exhibition that spans both of the gallery's Chelsea locations

Rare ancient funerary plaque with corrections goes to auction

Major art exhibition addresses representations of the global refugee crisis

Thought-provoking Jim Carrey exhibition opens at the Phi Centre as a world premiere

James Cohan opens an exhibition of new paintings by Scott Olson

Frist Art Museum opens "Monsters & Myths: Surrealism and War in the 1930s and 1940s"

Georgia Museum of Art displays minimal works in "Color, Form and Light"

Stephen Shore curates show of his Bard students at Howard Greenberg Gallery

Museum of Cycladic Art presents a rare and original exhibition entitled Picasso and Antiquity: Line and Clay

Hake's July 10-11 auction a pop culture feast with rare original comic art, comic books, Star Wars & more

Material Culture Auctions sets record prices for Outsider Art

Fashion world shaken by cultural appropriation claims

Bolshoi ballet star pays tribute to Coco Chanel in new show

Tretyakov Gallery opens exhibition program at a brand new venue

High Museum of Art celebrates Maira Kalman's book art with summer retrospective

Eat like the locals: How scurvy undid last crusader king

Exhibition of new work by Anne-Karin Furunes opens at Ryan Lee

Olivia Newton-John's Grease leather jacket and pants + more head to Julien's Auctions

How accurate is zodiac compatibility

3 Lessons from J.K. Rowling to Make Your Writing Richer

Tips and suggestions for paper writing

Here are your new income tax slab brackets for 2019




Museums, Exhibits, Artists, Milestones, Digital Art, Architecture, Photography,
Photographers, Special Photos, Special Reports, Featured Stories, Auctions, Art Fairs,
Anecdotes, Art Quiz, Education, Mythology, 3D Images, Last Week, .

 



Founder:
Ignacio Villarreal
(1941 - 2019)
Editor & Publisher: Jose Villarreal
Art Director: Juan José Sepúlveda Ramírez
Writer: Ofelia Zurbia Betancourt

Royalville Communications, Inc
produces:

ignaciovillarreal.org juncodelavega.com facundocabral-elfinal.org
Founder's Site. Hommage
to a Mexican poet.
Hommage
       

The First Art Newspaper on the Net. The Best Versions Of Ave Maria Song Junco de la Vega Site Ignacio Villarreal Site
Tell a Friend
Dear User, please complete the form below in order to recommend the Artdaily newsletter to someone you know.
Please complete all fields marked *.
Sending Mail
Sending Successful