The First Art Newspaper on the Net   Established in 1996 Tuesday, November 24, 2020


Zimmerli Art Museum offers new tools for visitors with sensory-related disorders
Zimmerli Art Museum at Rutgers University is certified sensory inclusive.



NEW BRUNSWICK, NJ.- The Zimmerli Art Museum at Rutgers University-New Brunswick is the first art museum in New Jersey to offer specialized tools to help visitors on the autism spectrum enjoy their visit without stressful sensory overload.

The museum is collaborating with KultureCity, a nonprofit that has also worked with MetLife Stadium, to offer the training and materials needed to provide a more positive experience for those with autism, PTSD or other conditions that may cause sensory overload.

Free sensory inclusive bags available to use during visits include fidget tools (handheld objects that can be squeezed and manipulated to help focus the user’s sense of touch), cue cards that people with verbal impairments can use to communicate their needs and moods, noise-cancelling headphones and weighted lap pads to help direct the user’s feeling of their center of gravity.

“A common misperception is that autism is just a behavioral disorder, but it affects processes in our nervous system, which can create a feeling of vertigo or the sense of a lack of gravity,” said Elizabeth Torres, a Rutgers professor of psychology and director of the New Jersey Autism Center of Excellence at Rutgers–New Brunswick. “Astronauts who return from a long space mission are given weighted suits to bring back their center of gravity until they readjust. In a similar fashion, people with autism can’t always feel their own body weight. For some, the feeling is constant and very disorienting.”

Through the partnership with KultureCity, Zimmerli staff received training on how to recognize when a visitor may have sensory needs, such as covering their ears or flapping their hands, and how to step in and offer them sensory support.

“We’re now better prepared to assist guests with autism and other sensory sensitivities in having the most comfortable and accommodating experience possible when attending any exhibition or program at the museum,” said Thomas Sokolowski, Zimmerli Art Museum director.

Before adopting the new sensory tools, the Zimmerli offered customized group tours to visitors with autism and related conditions. A KultureCity app is also available for download that displays available sensory devices at Zimmerli and how they can be accessed, as well as a customized social story that helps visitors prepare for their visit.

“People with sensory disorders and their families now have the freedom to visit at any time and have confidence they will be assisted properly if they experience sensory overload or otherwise need support,” said Amanda Potter, curator of education at the Zimmerli.

Potter said the sensory tools can help people of all ages. “There is also a necklace that visitors can wear that alerts staff to keep a close eye on a person so they don’t get separated from their group, which can happen not only to children but to people with dementia.”

While the sensory tools are a big first step to helping combat sensory sensitivity, Torres said museums can do more, such as partnering with autism centers and offering information cards to improve public understanding of autism-related disorders.

“We are having exploratory conversations with Rutgers' Center for Adult Autism Services to find more ways to help the autism community in New Jersey, including by providing job services and creating designated quiet spaces during crowded events, such as Rutgers Day,” Potter said. “Autism services are an area for growth, so we will work to expand our services. This is just the start.”

Rutgers-New Brunswick is a leader in autism research and services, recently appointing its inaugural director of the Rutgers Center for Autism Research, Education and Services (RUCARES) and CHS-RUCARES, a clinical entity created through Rutgers’ partnership with Children’s Specialized Hospital. The university’s Douglass Developmental Disabilities Center includes an on-campus K-12 day school for children with autism. In addition, the university broke ground on a new state-of-the-art facility for the Rutgers Center for Adult Autism Services, which provides employment, vocational training and other services and partners with Children’s Specialized Hospital to operate the New Jersey Autism Center of Excellence.










Today's News

April 4, 2020

What New York looked like during the 1918 flu pandemic

Gropius Bau announces the digital launch of an exhibition by Lee Mingwei

Lacoste/Keane Gallery opens an exhibition of ceramics by Jeff Shapiro

Bill Withers, soul legend who sang 'Lean on Me' and 'Lovely Day,' dies at 81

Phoenix Art Museum appoints new Sybil Harrington Director and CEO

How Coronavirus is changing the art & collectables auction market

Online-only sale features paintings of women across Southeast Asian cultures

Controversial Soviet-era statue removed in Prague

French orchestra plays on through virus confinement

Elite pulp artists celebrated in Heritage illustration art auction

Steidl publishes 'Hans Danuser: Darkrooms of Photography'

Tate launches new video tours of major exhibitions

Zimmerli Art Museum offers new tools for visitors with sensory-related disorders

Jazz festival in Montreal cancelled due to pandemic

Harriet Glickman, who pushed 'Peanuts' to add an African American character, dies at 93

Program goes virtual with online drawing tutorials from Australian artists

Quality collections will be featured in Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates auction

Japan telework orchestra strikes a chord in coronavirus gloom

Ken Shimura, comedian whose sketches delighted Japan, dies at 70

Never given a close look to Hitchcock? Start here

Technology issues, social distancing can't stop a fun auction

Four fast Fords add to the fun & interest of H&H Classics online-only auction

Phillips embarks on 5th anniversary in Asia with 'Made in Hong Kong' campaign

The Met launches new online programming and social media initiatives

How and Why Hollywood increase Human Growth Hormone levels?

TIPS TO PLAY POKER PROFESSIONALLY

Online gaming booms as virus lockdowns keep millions at home

Some Important Tips About Small Business VoIP Phone Service Providers 2020

The Best Songs which World came across

Humanoid-Like Robots and Peoples' Workplace Preference





Museums, Exhibits, Artists, Milestones, Digital Art, Architecture, Photography,
Photographers, Special Photos, Special Reports, Featured Stories, Auctions, Art Fairs,
Anecdotes, Art Quiz, Education, Mythology, 3D Images, Last Week, .

 



Founder:
Ignacio Villarreal
(1941 - 2019)
Editor & Publisher: Jose Villarreal
Art Director: Juan José Sepúlveda Ramírez

Royalville Communications, Inc
produces:

ignaciovillarreal.org avemariasound.org juncodelavega.com facundocabral-elfinal.org
Founder's Site. The most varied versions
of this beautiful prayer.
Hommage
to a Mexican poet.
Hommage
       

The First Art Newspaper on the Net. The Best Versions Of Ave Maria Song Junco de la Vega Site Ignacio Villarreal Site
Tell a Friend
Dear User, please complete the form below in order to recommend the Artdaily newsletter to someone you know.
Please complete all fields marked *.
Sending Mail
Sending Successful