The First Art Newspaper on the Net   Established in 1996 Friday, December 4, 2020


Getty Museum opens 'Michelangelo: Mind of The Master'
Michelangelo Buonarroti (Italian, 1475 - 1564), The Holy Family with Saint John the Baptist (recto); Amorous Putti at Play; Head of a Bird (verso), 1525-early 1530s. Black and red chalk and pen and ink, over leadpoint underdrawing (recto); pen and ink (verso) 27.9 × 39.4 cm (11 × 15 1/2 in.) The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles 93.GB.51.



LOS ANGELES, CA.- Michelangelo: Mind of the Master brings a collection of rare Michelangelo drawings of the highest quality to Los Angeles from February 25 through June 7, 2020, offering visitors the opportunity to see first-hand the genesis of some of the master’s most iconic works.

Michelangelo (1475-1564) is widely acknowledged as one of the most creative and influential artists in the history of western art. Indeed, his most famous works—from the marble David in Florence to the fresco paintings in the Sistine Chapel and the monumental dome of Saint Peter’s in Rome—have come do define the Italian Renaissance. Moreover, Michelangelo was a brilliant draftsman, making the up-close study of his drawings an unparalleled experience.

“Every one of Michelangelo’s iconic creations began with a drawing,” said Timothy Potts, director of the Getty Museum. “It is through his masterful drawings that we can witness his creative process at its most spontaneous and expressive. This exhibition presents works from the unrivaled collection of the Teylers Museum in the Netherlands that have never before been exhibited as a group in the United States. This exhibition is truly a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity that cannot fail to make a lasting impression on all who see it.”

Organized by the Cleveland Museum of Art and the Getty Museum in conjunction with the Teylers Museum, Haarlem, the Netherlands, Michelangelo: Mind of the Master brings an important selection of more than 28 exquisite Michelangelo drawings of the highest quality, many of which have never before been shown outside of Europe. Most of the sheets have sketches on both sides of the paper, and will be exhibited on freestanding pedestals so visitors can witness Michelangelo’s use of the entire sheet.

Given that Michelangelo burned large quantities of his drawings, the exhibition provides an unusual opportunity to experience firsthand a key group of surviving sketches, most of which were once in the collection of Queen Christina of Sweden (1626-1689), a fascinating and unconventional art-loving monarch who abdicated the throne and moved to Rome, where she built a famously important art collection.

“Drawing was a key aspect of Michelangelo’s creativity, and arguably no artist has used it more effectively in the expression of the human form,” said Julian Brooks, curator of drawings at Getty Museum. “From preparatory drawings and compositional sketches to detailed figure studies, the drawings in Mind of the Master are a revelation, offering incomparable insight into the fertile imagination and hard work of a titan among Renaissance artists.”

The exhibition explores the range of Michelangelo’s work as a painter, sculptor, and architect through his works on paper, including designs for celebrated projects such as the Sistine Chapel ceiling, the Last Judgement, the Medici Chapel tombs, and the cupola of Saint Peter’s basilica, Rome.

For Michelangelo, drawing was a fundamental, lifelong activity. When he was a student, it helped him learn from other artists’ work; thereafter drawing was a tool he used to capture reality and the conceptions of his imagination. Consistently dedicated to drawing the human figure from life, a growing practice in Florentine artists’ studios at the time, Michelangelo took this to a new level of verisimilitude through keen observation, as well as by studying dissected corpses to better understand the underlying muscles.

Early in his career, Michelangelo drew mainly in pen and ink, but he soon came to appreciate the convenience and effectiveness of naturally mined chalk. He used both red and black colors, preferring the latter as time went on.

Today, as through history, Michelangelo’s drawings are valued not only as works exhibiting extraordinary skill but also as windows into the mind of the master —an intimate way to explore the creation of some of the greatest works of Renaissance art.

The Teylers Museum opened its doors in 1784 and is known as the oldest museum in the Netherlands, with a collection that is unique in the world. The collection of Michelangelo drawings has been in the museum since 1791 and this is the first time they have left the Teylers Museum as a group.

The Cleveland Museum of Art has published an accompanying catalog with contributions from leading art historians including Emily Peters, Julian Brooks, and Carel van Tuyll van Serooskerken. At Getty, the exhibition is curated by Julian Brooks, senior curator of drawings with Edina Adam, assistant curator of drawings.










Today's News

February 25, 2020

Barry Art Museum opens an exhibition of work of abstract painter Joan Thorne

Nationalmuseum acquires a work by Artemisia Gentileschi

Getty Museum opens 'Michelangelo: Mind of The Master'

The Momentary, designed by Chicago-based Wheeler Kearns Architects, opens in Bentonville

Centraal Museum Utrecht presents 'The Tears of Eros: Moesman, Surrealism and the Sexes'

Rick Springfield auctioning personal guitar collection for Australian fire relief

The Barnes Foundation opens 'Marie Cuttoli: The Modern Thread from Miró to Man Ray'

First U.S. survey of Forensic Architecture's work opens in Miami

Million dollar Baltimore coin set for auction

Rubik's Cube Mona Lisa fetches 480,000 euros at Paris auction

Paris braces for tourism hit as virus keeps Chinese at home

Hundreds of orchestral arrangements owned by Judy Garland to be auctioned

Is this the best opera singer you've (probably) never heard of?

Bonnie MacLean, psychedelic poster artist, is dead at 80

CHAT announces the appointment of Takahashi Mizuki as Executive Director and Chief Curator

apexart opens an exhibition of textile-based installations

Exhibition explores the politics of space and place

Rhode Island School of Design presents an exhibition by American artist Martin Mull

Litvinenko murder has hallmarks of an opera: composer

Vancouver Art Gallery receives $1.5 million gift for new building

Pride & Prejudice brings $100k in Sale of Fine Books & Manuscripts at Swann

The Pont Neuf Wrapped (Project For Paris) highlights Bonhams Post-War & Contemporary Art Sale

Galleries at the Historic Thomas Center open RBL GRL / Revolution Doesn't Ask Permission

miart, organized by Fiera Milano announces the first edition of the INNSiDE Prize

Best Sand and Dust Filter for Pool:

Ancient Resource Auctions' Spring Antiquities Sale has authentic antiquities and ethnographic art





Museums, Exhibits, Artists, Milestones, Digital Art, Architecture, Photography,
Photographers, Special Photos, Special Reports, Featured Stories, Auctions, Art Fairs,
Anecdotes, Art Quiz, Education, Mythology, 3D Images, Last Week, .

 



Founder:
Ignacio Villarreal
(1941 - 2019)
Editor & Publisher: Jose Villarreal
Art Director: Juan José Sepúlveda Ramírez

Royalville Communications, Inc
produces:

ignaciovillarreal.org avemariasound.org juncodelavega.com facundocabral-elfinal.org
Founder's Site. The most varied versions
of this beautiful prayer.
Hommage
to a Mexican poet.
Hommage
       

The First Art Newspaper on the Net. The Best Versions Of Ave Maria Song Junco de la Vega Site Ignacio Villarreal Site
Tell a Friend
Dear User, please complete the form below in order to recommend the Artdaily newsletter to someone you know.
Please complete all fields marked *.
Sending Mail
Sending Successful