The First Art Newspaper on the Net    Established in 1996 Monday, October 3, 2022


Auschwitz acquires stamps used to tattoo prisoners at the infamous death camp
Metal stamps used for tattooing Auschwitz prisoners now part of the collection of the Auschwitz Museum after being discovered in southern Poland. The Nazi German concentration and extermination camp was the only one where prisoner were tattooed with identification numbers. AFP PHOTO / HO / AUSCHWITZ MUSEUM / PAWEL SAWICKI.

By: Mary Sibierski



WARSAW (AFP).- Rare metal stamps used by the Nazis to tattoo prisoners at the infamous Auschwitz-Birkenau death camp have surfaced in Poland.

A donor insisting on anonymity handed over the stamps to the memorial museum at the site of the World War II-era camp in Oswiecim, southern Poland.

"We obtained the stamps a couple of weeks ago and have confirmed their authenticity," Bartosz Bartyzel, a spokesman for the museum, told AFP on Thursday.

"There are five stamps including one zero, two threes and two sixes or nines," he said, adding that Auschwitz was the only Nazi German camp to use tattoos to identify prisoners.

The find is rare. The only other known tool to tattoo camp prisoners is stored at the Military Medical Museum in Saint Petersburg, according to the Auschwitz museum.

The stamps were discovered in the "area of one of the evacuation routes" the Nazis used in January 1945 to move tens of thousands of prisoners to the west of Auschwitz as Soviet troops zeroed in on the camp from the east, Bartyzel said.

The routes stretched 50 to 60 kilometres (30 to 35 miles) north and south from the camp to the towns of Gliwice and Wodzislaw, according to a map on the museum website.

The museum said it would not be providing further details, to preserve the donor's anonymity.

After invading Poland in 1939, Nazi Germany set up the camp at a former army barracks in the city of Oswiecim, or Auschwitz in German.

It has become an enduring symbol of Germany's genocide of European Jews. One million were killed there from 1940 to 1945.

More than 100,000 others including non-Jewish Poles, Roma, Soviet prisoners of war and anti-Nazi partisans also died at Auschwitz.

"As the number of survivors dwindles, this kind of discovery is invaluable. It's a testimony to what happened here," Bartyzel said.

The Nazis began using tattoos when other methods of identifying prisoners -- including numbered uniforms -- failed, Bartyzel said.

Soviet prisoners of war were the first to get tattooed in 1941. The practice was expanded to the rest of the camp the following year.

The Nazis pressed the needle-studded plates into an inmate's skin, before rubbing ink into the wound to create the tattoo. They first tattooed chests, then later left forearms.

The stamps will be stored in the museum's archives before going on display in a few years in a new exhibition.



© 1994-2014 Agence France-Presse










Today's News

March 17, 2014

Shown for the first time outside Italy, The Treasure of San Gennaro opens at Musée Maillol

Colombian artist Fernando Botero says in interview he is 'not obsessed with fat women'

Dissident artist Ai Weiwei asks China president Xi Jinping to visit his Berlin exhibition

Priosphenodon minimus: Argentinean paleontologists discover a new species of dinosaur-era reptile

Exhibition celebrates 100th anniversary of journey to Tunisia by Klee, Macke and Moilliet

Oklahoma City Museum of Art announces exhibitions by Brett Weston and Ansel Adams

From Blair to Bonham-Carter: The Lowry exhibits Jonathan Yeo's portraits of performance and power

Time-based Media Art from the Julia Stoschek Collection on view at ZKM in Karlsruhe

Auschwitz acquires stamps used to tattoo prisoners at the infamous death camp

The Museum of Modern Art presents a retrospective of American artist Robert Heinecken

Sculptural installations and interventions by Maria Nepomuceno on view at Victoria Miro

Paintings and drawings from the 1980s by Gunar Örn Gunnarsson on view at Moeller Fine Art

War, the latest visitor to one of the most important cultural centres of the ancient world: Palmyra

German Contemporary artist Andre Butzer opens exhibition at Carbon 12 in Dubai

Present Perfect? Contemporary photography from Iran exhibition opens at QUAD, Derby

Ryan Gander exhibist new works at 2 Willow Road

Rediscover forgotten basketball history this spring at the New-York Historical Society

Art Gallery of Greater Victoria appoints BC Architects to revamp Moss Street Gallery

Haggerty Museum spring 2014 exhibitions highlight materialism and consumer culture

Exhibition of paintings by Jorge Queiroz opens at VeneKlasen/Werner in Berlin

Rafael Vega "Recent Works" opens at Walter Otero Contemporary Art in San Juan

Solo exhibition by conceptual artist Abdulnasser Gharem opens at Ayyam Gallery Dubai




Museums, Exhibits, Artists, Milestones, Digital Art, Architecture, Photography,
Photographers, Special Photos, Special Reports, Featured Stories, Auctions, Art Fairs,
Anecdotes, Art Quiz, Education, Mythology, 3D Images, Last Week, .

 



Founder:
Ignacio Villarreal
(1941 - 2019)
Editor & Publisher: Jose Villarreal
Art Director: Juan José Sepúlveda Ramírez

Royalville Communications, Inc
produces:

ignaciovillarreal.org juncodelavega.com facundocabral-elfinal.org
Founder's Site. Hommage
to a Mexican poet.
Hommage
       

The First Art Newspaper on the Net. The Best Versions Of Ave Maria Song Junco de la Vega Site Ignacio Villarreal Site
Tell a Friend
Dear User, please complete the form below in order to recommend the Artdaily newsletter to someone you know.
Please complete all fields marked *.
Sending Mail
Sending Successful