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Jenny Holzer shines new light in dark places

Jenny Holzer’s “Installation for the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum,” 1989/2024 in New York on May 15, 2024. Jenny Holzer’s signboards predated by a decade the news “crawl.” At the Guggenheim she is still bending the curve: Just read the art, is the message. (Jenny Holzer/Artist Rights Society (ARS), New York; Photo by Jeenah Moon /The New York Times)

NEW YORK, NY.- Thirty-five years after she first set the Guggenheim’s rotunda ablaze with an electronic text racing along its spiral ramp, Jenny Holzer is reprising the installation, and turning up the heat. “Light Line,” a career-spanning exhibition, presents a newly updated LED sign which, together with other recent work, illuminates changes in political language and its modes of delivery unimaginable in 1989. Her advice to viewers has remained fixed: Just read the art. The targets of the texts Holzer wrote between the late 1970s and 2001 — variously ... More


The Best Photos of the Day






Lebohang Kganye wins the Deutsche Börse Photography Foundation Prize 2024   Dancing past the Venus de Milo   Francis Ford Coppola accused of trying to kiss extras on 'Megalopolis' set


Lebohang Kganye (b. 1990, South Africa) combines photography, sculpture, performance, theatre and moving image into her multifaceted artistic practice.

LONDON.- The artist was announced as the 2024 winner of the prestigious £30,000 prize at a special ceremony at The Photographers’ Gallery, London, by Justine Simons, Deputy Mayor for Culture and the Creative Industries for London, on Thursday 16 May 2024. The influential prize, in partnership ... More
 

A yoga class, held before crowds arrive, in The Louvre Museum in Paris, on May 3, 2024. (Dmitry Kostyukov/The New York Times)

PARIS.- I fell in love with the Louvre one morning while doing disco moves to Michael Jackson’s “Don’t Stop ’Til You Get Enough” in the Salle des Cariatides. The museum, a former medieval fortress and then royal palace, had not yet opened, and I was following instructions to catwalk and hip bump and ... More
 

Francis Ford Coppola in Napa, Calif., Nov. 20, 2020. (Mark Mahaney/The New York Times).

NEW YORK, NY.- As anticipation for the premiere of “Megalopolis,” Francis Ford Coppola’s first film in more than a decade, built to a fever pitch at Cannes, the director faced accusations Tuesday that he tried to kiss extras during a nightclub sequence. A report in The Guardian detailing the film’s chaotic production said that according to ... More



First museum dedicated to Sufi art and culture to open in Paris this autumn   Friedman Benda opens a solo exhibition of works by Carmen D'Apollonio   The old-fashioned library at the heart of the AI boom


Bianca Bondi, Wishing Well IV, 2021, Courtesy of the artist and mor charpentier. Photo by François Doury.

PARIS.- The Musée d’Art et de Culture Soufis MTO, the first museum dedicated to exploring the art and culture of Sufism, opens in Chatou, a suburb of Paris, on 28 September 2024. A permanent collection of Sufi art and cultural objects and a programme of contemporary art exhibitions, talks, events ... More
 

Carmen D'Apollonio, I'm bigger than you think I am, 2024.

LOS ANGELES, CA.- Friedman Benda presents, Hallo It’s me again, a solo presentation by Carmen D’Apollonio, in the gallery’s Los Angeles location. This setting debuts recent work by the local artist, who has secured international recognition for her evocative sculptural lighting that uniquely investigates the spectrum ... More
 

The library inside the San Francisco office of OpenAI, on April 4, 2024. (Christie Hemm Klok/The New York Times)

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF.- The two-story library has Oriental rugs, shaded lamps dotting its desks and rows of hardbacks lining its walls. It is the architectural centerpiece of the offices of OpenAI, the startup whose online chatbot, ChatGPT, showed the world that machines can instantly generate their ... More


MCA Australia appoints Samantha Luck as Director of Development   JFK's handwritten notes from November 21, 1963 fetch $34,504 at auction   D'Metrius Rice's first solo presentation in New York City opens at Morgan Lehman Gallery


Samantha Luck. Photo: Marcus Wright.

SYDNEY.- The Museum of Contemporary Art Australia announced today the appointment of Samantha Luck as the Museum's Director of Development. Samantha Luck is a highly skilled professional, specialising in business development, philanthropy and partnerships with over a decade of experience in senior leadership positions ... More
 

John F. Kennedy Handwritten Notes and Doodles from Houston's Rice Hotel on November 21, 1963. Sold For: $34,504 (w/BP).

BOSTON, MASS.- Handwritten notes and doodles by President John F. Kennedy from the night before his tragic assassination sold for $34,504, according to Boston-based RR Auction. These notes, captured on stationery from Houston's Rice ... More
 

D'Metrius Rice, Pistachio, 2024. Acrylic and latex on canvas in artist frame, 20h x 16w x 1d in (50.80h x 40.64w x 2.54d cm).

NEW YORK, NY.- Morgan Lehman Gallery debuts the Baltimore-based painter D'Metrius Rice's first solo presentation in New York City: Autotune. Rice's paintings are characterized by their DIY architecture, flattened lego-like conglomerations of colorful ... More


New details revealed for 23rd Serpentine Pavilion designed by Minsuk Cho   Hoor Al Qasimi appointed as Artistic Director of the 25th Biennale of Sydney   Katherine Porter, painter of intuitive expressionism, dies at 82


Serpentine Pavilion 2024 designed by Minsuk Cho, Mass Studies. Design render, view of void from the Gallery and Play Tower. Photo © Mass Studies, Courtesy: Serpentine.

LONDON.- The 23rd Serpentine Pavilion, Archipelagic Void, designed by Seoul-based Korean architect Minsuk Cho and his firm Mass Studies opens to the public on 7 June 2024, with Goldman Sachs supporting the annual project for the 10th consecutive year. Launching a season of specially curated activations, the 23rd Serpentine Pavilion will play ... More
 

25th Biennale of Sydney Artistic Director Hoor Al Qasimi. Photo by Dan Boud.

SYDNEY.- The Biennale of Sydney announced Hoor Al Qasimi as the Artistic Director of the 25th Biennale of Sydney, which will take place from 7 March – 8 June 2026. Hoor Al Qasimi is the President and Director of Sharjah Art Foundation, the independent public arts organisation in the UAE founded by her in 2009 as a catalyst and advocate for the arts around the world. Al Qasimi has ... More
 

Porter, a painter who carried an intuitive, dreamy, vividly colored branch of Expressionism into the 21st century, died on April 22, 2024, at her home in Santa Fe, N.M. She was 82. (Katherine Porter, via LewAllen Galleries via The New York Times)

NEW YORK, NY.- Katherine Porter, a painter who carried an intuitive, dreamy, vividly colored branch of expressionism into the 21st century, died April 22 at her home in Santa Fe, New Mexico. She was 82. LewAllen Galleries in Santa Fe, which represents ... More




More News
Photo London x Nikon Emerging Photographer Award 2024 winner announced
LONDON.- Photo London announced that Charlie Tallott, who is represented by New Dimension, is the winner of the 2024 Photo London x Nikon Emerging Photographer Award. The announcement was made on the evening of Wednesday 15 May during a special ceremony that took place in the Nikon Gallery, Somerset House during Photo London 2024. Originally from Yorkshire, Tallott began taking photos in and around his grandparents house in Cross Gates, East Leeds. The influence of his family, upbringing, and hometown permeates his work, which centres around delving into the profound social and psychological impacts of deindustrialisation through photography. At Least Until the World Stops Going Round is a series of work produced three years ago following a suicide attempt. During the three months that Tallott spent recovering ... More

Recently discovered rare and unknown handwritten lyrics penned by Bob Dylan to hit the auction block
NEW YORK, NY.- Lion Heart Autographs, one of the world’s most recognized and respected auction houses and a dealer specializing in manuscripts and rare documents has announced its next auction taking place on Wednesday, June 5, 2024. Among the sale’s highlights are two unknown pages of unpublished lyrics written by Dylan in New York in the early1980s. Considered one of the 20th Century’s most influential artists, Bob Dylan reshaped popular music to become the voice of his generation. His poetic lyricism has been appreciated by millions worldwide and acknowledged at the highest level when he was awarded the 2016 Nobel Prize in literature. This remarkable set of lyrics, which contain numerous references to the Biblewas written in ballpoint pen on two sheets from a New York City Ritz Carlton Hotel telephone message ... More

New board trustees appointed as construction starts on the future Vancouver Art Gallery
VANCOUVER.- As construction continues on the new Vancouver Art Gallery, located at the intersection of downtown’s West Georgia and Cambie Streets, the Gallery has appointed Jon Stovell as the new Chair and Esther Rausenberg as the new Vice Chair of its Association Board. The duo has been elected for their expertise to help shape the future vision for one of North America’s most innovative visual arts institutions, with the completion of the new Vancouver Art Gallery expected in the fall of 2028. “We are extremely fortunate to welcome two highly experienced and influential individuals, with distinct backgrounds and perspectives,” says Anthony Kiendl, Vancouver Art Gallery CEO & Executive Director. "Jon and Esther’s unique experiences and deep knowledge will provide strategic counsel to the evolution of our future Gallery.” As Chief ... More

Parsons Dance spins and darts through Miles Davis
NEW YORK, NY.- The combination of choreographer Jamar Roberts and jazz is a dance land you want to live in. Roberts, a veteran of Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater, has made some of his most succinct yet passionate works to jazz. His voluptuous movement, however sharp or delicate, flows on waves of musical notes. In his latest jazz-inspired work, “Juke,” a premiere for Parsons Dance, bodies bend and dart with shuddering briskness as the dancers dig into what it means to juke, or to fake a move — like in sports. One by one, they dodge, slip and outmaneuver the music, “Spanish Key” from Miles Davis’ groundbreaking 1970 album “Bitches Brew,” with its rock and funk influences. The dancers, twisting and spinning — sometimes agile, like boxers — fill the stage like brushstrokes, some rapturous and others cutting. “Juke,” which debuted Tuesday, ... More

Why do people make music?
NEW YORK, NY.- Music baffled Charles Darwin. Humanity’s ability to produce and enjoy melodies, he wrote in 1874, “must be ranked amongst the most mysterious with which he is endowed.” All human societies made music, and yet, for Darwin, it seemed to offer no advantage to our survival. He speculated that music evolved as a way to win over potential mates. Our “half-human ancestors,” as he called them, “aroused each other’s ardent passions during their courtship and rivalry.” Other Victorian scientists were skeptical. William James brushed off Darwin’s idea, arguing that music is simply a byproduct of how our minds work — a “mere incidental peculiarity of the nervous system.” That debate continues to this day. Some researchers are developing new evolutionary explanations for music. Others maintain that music is a cultural invention, ... More

He thought he had bought a great apartment. The ceiling held a secret.
NEW YORK, NY.- It’s as if you discovered that the living room in your new apartment had been painted by Michelangelo. Frank DiLella moved to New York City in 2002 to study journalism and theater at Fordham University. After he graduated, he rented apartments in Astoria, Queens, and in Hell’s Kitchen and on the Upper West Side of Manhattan. By 2020, he was ready to put down roots and buy something. In September, with COVID raging, he found a 650-square foot, one-bedroom co-op, near Central Park. At the time, the working fireplace was the biggest allure. “I loved it on sight,” said DiLella, 40, the host of “On Stage,” a program about the theater scene on Spectrum News NY1. “It was cozy, warm and had so much potential.” He made an offer to the co-op board that is responsible for a row of 1880s houses in the 100 block of West ... More

Too red, too vampiric, too sexy: A brief history of polarizing royal portraits
LONDON.- Royal family members sit for portraits a lot. And even when they don’t, artists paint them anyway. Some of these portraits have drawn near-unanimous praise and stood the test of time, captivating viewers generations later. Others have attracted mixed reactions, scandal or controversy. With some artworks, critics objected royals were too gloomy, too naked, or, in the case of King Charles III’s latest portrait, too red. In the painting unveiled Tuesday, Charles is enveloped in a cloud of crimson, hot pink and fuchsia. The artist, Jonathan Yeo, told The New York Times in an interview last month that he got to know his subject over four sittings, beginning in 2021, when Charles was still Prince of Wales, and continuing after the coronation last May. “Age and experience were suiting him,” Yeo said. “His ... More

Cool off at Morphy's refreshing June 7-8 Soda Pop & Antique Advertising Auction in Las Vegas
LAS VEGAS, NEV.- Soda fountain memorabilia is pure American nostalgia, harkening back to a time when the local soda shop or drug store was the place where everyone went to socialize over light refreshment. Beverage brands were fiercely competitive marketers, providing lavish ceramic syrup dispensers and vibrantly colorful advertising signage to establishments where their products were sold. Those promotional items are now the objects of their own competition, at high-profile soda pop and antique advertising auctions like the one Morphy’s will conduct on June 7-8 in Las Vegas. The 1,329-lot sale includes not only beverage-related items but also signage, display items and fountain accessories for various ice cream brands. In addition, there are advertising clocks, radios, a Seeburg jukebox, vending machines, seltzer bottles and more. ... More

National Nordic Museum acquires Ginny Ruffner's Project Aurora
SEATTLE, WA.- The captivating green and blue rivers of the Aurora Borealis will be on permanent display at the National Nordic Museum. The installation created by world renowned artist Ginny Ruffner is now part of the museum’s permanent collection of art and artifacts. Project Aurora is a bright wall of light, 20 feet high and 10 feet wide, made up of 34,560 individual LED lights. Shimmering sheets of colored light, drawn from images of the Aurora Borealis, are programmed to undulate across the wall of light. Microprocessors update the installation 20 times per second, creating a peak brightness of 350,000 lumens; the light equivalent of 225 traditional 100-watt bulbs. Aided by artificial intelligence, the piece captures the unpredictability of the natural phenomenon. “The Nordic Museum is the PERFECT place for Project Aurora. I am thrilled and very honored that it is becomin ... More

Arooj Aftab knows you love her sad music. But she's ready for more.
NEW YORK, NY.- In a remote studio in north Brooklyn, actress Tessa Thompson stood behind a camera and instructed a young model how to project a precise but elusive expression of longing: “Almost like you can’t help it,” she suggested from beneath a black beret. Thompson was making her debut behind the camera, directing a music video by Pakistani composer and vocalist Arooj Aftab. “This is a dream come true,” Thompson said between takes on an afternoon in March. “A dream I didn’t know I had.” The clip was for Aftab’s latest song, the dusky “Raat Ki Rani,” from her fourth solo album, “Night Reign,” due May 31. Drawing inspiration from Ingmar Bergman’s 1966 thriller, “Persona,” the treatment weaves an imagistic love story between two women into a trippy meta-narrative that takes place on the set of a perfume commercial. Accordingly, ... More

In 'Invasive Species,' the acting bug bites, dramatically
NEW YORK, NY.- Maia Novi’s “Invasive Species” is being marketed as an outrageous dark comedy, but it’s a quieter play than that: about being an Argentine immigrant with Hollywood ambitions, a graduate acting student at Yale and a psychiatric inpatient plagued by intrusive thoughts. “My name is Maia,” the play’s central character (Novi) tells the audience near the top of the show. “And this is a true story.” Well, true-ish, given that we’ve just seen her get bitten by the Acting Bug (Julian Sanchez), a human-size creature with a giant proboscis whose process of infecting Maia involves spitting voluptuously onto her face from above. A bit of hallucinatory license, then, has sometimes been taken. Directed by Michael Breslin at the Vineyard’s Dimson Theater, the play fragments into different worlds. The most realistic is the hospital in New Haven where Maia ... More




How dreams inspire this painter's work | Portia Zvavahera | PROGRAM



Flashback
On a day like today, Italian painter Sandro Botticelli died
May 17, 1510. Alessandro di Mariano di Vanni Filipepi (c. 1445 - May 17, 1510), known as Sandro Botticelli, was an Italian painter of the Early Renaissance. He belonged to the Florentine School under the patronage of Lorenzo de' Medici, a movement that Giorgio Vasari would characterize less than a hundred years later in his Vita of Botticelli as a "golden age". In this image: Alessandro Filipepi, called Sandro Botticelli, The Madonna and Child with the Young Saint John the Baptist. Tempera, oil and gold on panel / 46.3 x 36.8 cm. Estimate: $5,000,000-7,000,000. Photo: Christie's Images Ltd 2012.



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